December Winter Share

Copy of farm to table

We have had some challenging winter days the past couple of weeks: if you are reading this, you must not be under a bank of snow. Congratulations! I hope that beyond the shoveling and snow-blowing and spinning and drifting, you have had a chance to enjoy how beautiful the whole world is under the winter-spun blanket.

This time of year tends to be busy – and many of us have traditions that bring us back to family or friends to share a meal or two. The traditions surrounding the food we eat at any holiday run deep in many families, and others may have more flexibility and change up seasonal cooking norms. I tend to like what I’ve eaten year in and year out. For just  a couple of meals a year: I like the same things over and over, and not much of it is all that healthy.

There are also common complaints about this Holiday season, probably more than any other. The complaints I’ve heard tend to center around the need to shop for gifts, and the expectations surrounding how families spend their time, and with whom, and when and all that. There are a lot of stressors. Not a small one is that people seem to feel trapped by how decadent the food is and that it is everywhere, all the time, in copious amounts. And when I say food, I mean treats. So, so many treats.

Over the years, I’ve found myself thinking that peoples’ complaints about this time of year aren’t really about the Holidays. The root of the problem is that all year long we feel stressed about expectations around family time, and about the endlessly available shopping options, and about the constantly available treats. We’ve spent 11 months burning ourselves out on it all and when the time rolls around for those things to be special, they aren’t any more. Now it becomes a matter of having to do all these things, but multiplied by 10 to make it seem special.

The older I get the more I think I would like a Christmas season that our families lean a little more to a “Little House on the Prairie” sort of gift exchange (i.e., a penny, candy small cake and little cup), and think of oranges as a bit of a treat.

Of course this time of year doesn’t hold exactly these kinds of issues for everyone. Some people don’t make a big deal out of the Holidays. Some people maybe would like to, but don’t have people near by to share the bounty with. There is of course a wide range of ways people spend their time and energy this time of year.

Perhaps parts of your winter share this month will add healthful and seasonal dishes to the bounty. Or, like the recipes below, somewhere between healthy and not. And wherever you enjoy your share, and with whomever you enjoy it: I hope it’s blessed.

And I hope that there are some moments of peace and love and simplicity for you this time of year as well.

From all of us at the Food Farm,

Karin


In your share this month:

Beets, Red cabbage, Carrots, Onions,  Russet and yellow potatoes, Delicata and Sunshine squash


 

Beet Chocolate Cake (From Bon Appétite)

Gluten free and dairy free

Cake

  • 4 medium beets, scrubbed
  • 2 Tbsp. virgin coconut oil, plus more for pan
  • ½ cup cocoa powder, plus more for pan
  • 1½ cups almond flour
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • ½ tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 2 oz. bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped
  • 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar or distilled white vinegar
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1¼ cups (packed) light brown sugar
  • 1 tsp. kosher salt

Glaze

  • 4 oz. bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped
  • 1 Tbsp. virgin coconut oil
  • ¼ tsp. vanilla extract
  • Pinch of kosher salt

    Cake:

  • Cook beets in a medium pot of boiling unsalted water until tender, 30–40 minutes, depending on size. Drain and rinse under cold water until cool enough to handle. Cut off stem end, then peel and cut beets into large pieces. Transfer to a blender and add 2 Tbsp. water. Blend, adding water 1 Tbsp. at a time as needed, until a smooth purée forms—it should be the consistency of applesauce. Measure out 1 cup purée (reserve remaining purée for another use, such as blending into a smoothie).

  • Preheat oven to 350°. Line bottom of an 8″ round cake pan with parchment. Grease with oil, then dust with cocoa powder, tapping out excess.

  • Whisk almond flour, baking soda, cinnamon, and remaining ½ cup cocoa powder in a medium bowl; set aside.

  • Heat chocolate and remaining 2 Tbsp. oil in a medium heatproof bowl set over a saucepan of barely simmering water, stirring often, until melted. Remove bowl from heat. Stir in vinegar, vanilla, and reserved 1 cup beet purée until smooth.

  • Beat eggs, brown sugar, and salt in the large bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment on medium-high speed (or use an electric mixer and large bowl) until more than tripled in volume and mixture holds a ribbon for several seconds when beater is lifted above batter, 5–7 minutes. Thoroughly beating the eggs is key to creating an aerated, light crumb and is a critical step when using gluten-free ingredients.

  • Pour chocolate-beet mixture into egg mixture and beat on medium-low speed until combined. Turn mixer off and gently tip in reserved dry ingredients. Beat on lowest speed, scraping down bowl as needed, until combined.

  • Transfer batter to prepared pan. Bake cake until a tester inserted into the center comes out clean and the top springs back when gently pressed, 45–50 minutes. Let cool 10 minutes. Carefully run a knife around edges of pan, then invert cake onto a wire rack and let cool.

    Glaze:

  • Heat chocolate, oil, vanilla, and salt in a medium heatproof bowl set over a saucepan of barely simmering water, stirring often, until chocolate is melted. Let cool, stirring occasionally, until mixture is thickened and cool enough to touch, 10–15 minutes.

  • Place rack with cake on a rimmed baking sheet. Pour glaze over center of cake to cover top, tilting baking sheet slightly to encourage a few drips to run over sides of cake. Let sit at room temperature until glaze is set, 2–3 hours.


Blue Cheese and Potato Tart

  • 1 Savory Tart Shell, below, or recipe of your choice, in a 9-inch tart pan and ready to fill
  • 1 pound potatoes, scrubbed and cut into 1/4-inch slices
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 1/4 pound blue cheese, crumbled (about 3/4 cup)
  • 1 tablespoons finely chopped herb or herbs of your choice, such as a mixture of thyme and rosemary
  • Fine sea salt for sprinkling

Preheat oven to 350°F. In a medium saucepan, cover potato slices with water by two inches. Simmer, uncovered, until tender, about 10 minutes. Drain. If the potatoes don’t seem very dry, pat them dry with towels.

Arrange potato slices, overlapping slightly, in concentric circles around the tart pan. Sprinkle blue cheese over potatoes. Whisk cream and egg yolk together and pour into tart shell, then sprinkle tart with herbs of your choice and salt.

Bake tart on a baking sheet until bubbling and golden brown, about 45 to 50 minutes. Cool in pan on rack and serve warm or cold. With a big green salad, for balance.

Savory Tart Shell

  • 1 1/4 (5 1/2 ounces) cups flour
  • 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 6 tablespoons (3 ounces) butter, diced
  • 1 large egg

In a large bowl, combine the flour, cornstarch and salt. Cut the butter in with a pastry blender, fork or two knives until it is in very tiny bits. Add one egg and mix with a fork until a dough forms. If this does not happen easily, toss it out onto a counter and knead it together. This dough is rather tough but with a little elbow grease, it does come together nicely.

This dough can also be made a food processor, or in a stand mixer, though I’ve only tried it in a food processor.

On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to a 12-inch circle. Place the dough in a 9-inch pie plate or tart pan and press to remove any air bubbles. Level the edges, and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Proceed with a filling of your choice, no parbaking required.

Summer CSA, Week 17

Rain rain go away,

Come again another day,

Rain rain go away,

We’d like to harvest our vegetables someday

So after the CSA on Monday I think we are going to start building an ark. Two of every vegetable of course. Two Astro vans, thank goodness. Wouldn’t want those to die off.

After a summer of wishing it would rain Mother Nature has decided now would be a much better time to challenge us. The thing is it’s way more fun to get rained on when it’s 70 or 80 degrees as opposed to 40 or 50 degrees.

Endless showers, impeachment headlines and vegetables that need harvesting. If you can find the joy then that could be a recipe for success.

Most of the week was spent harvesting the second planting of carrots. We also picked the last of the outside tomatoes and stacked the squash to store for winter. We took the new potato harvester for a test run. Little tweaks and improvements were made to the design. And it works great!

A ray of baby sunshine came out to the farm on Friday. Bosen and Karin lent a hand and all seemed right with the world again.

From a farm crew out finding the joy,

Tiffany


In Your CSA box:

Northeastern Pole Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Carrots, Cilantro, Cucumber, Lettuce, Yellow Onion, Parsley, Red-ish Sweet Peppers, Hot Peppers, Potatoes, Delicata and Sunshine Squash, Tomatoes, Turnips


Breakfast Huevos Rancheros

Lots of people have very different meanings for huevos rancheros. I like to keep it simple.

  • 2-4 medium potatoes (depending on number of people eating), shredded.
  • Salsa
  • Sour cream
  • Cilantro
  • Shredded cheese
  • Eggs and or meat of choice.

Shred potatoes and squeeze as much water out of them as possible. Heat skillet (cast iron is ideal) to medium high heat with olive oil. Test skillet with sample of potatoes or water to see if it sizzles.

Once skillet is hot place shredded potatoes evenly on skillet about 1-2 inches thick. Salt and pepper top. Drizzle olive oil over top as well.

Leave alone for 5 minutes. Check the bottom often to make sure it isn’t sticking to pan. Flip once golden brown. Salt and pepper other side. Wait another 5 minutes and turn off heat.

Fry eggs to desired consistency. I would recommend over medium-hard. Place shredded cheese on hash browns. Place cooked egg on top of cheese. Apply more cheese. Add a dollop of sour cream and salsa. Garnish with chopped cilantro.

Add ground beef or shredded pork if you are into that for a different flavor.

Autumn Harvest Salad

  • Delicata Squash
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 3 cooked beets
  • 1 raw onion
  • 1 bunch of crunchy kale
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 cup farro- cooked
  • 3/4 tsp chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp paprika
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 tbsp Apple cider vinegar
  • 4 tbsp olive oil
  • 4 oz goat cheese
  • Parsley for garnish

Set oven to 400 degrees. Cut delicata into slices. Dress with olive oil, salt pepper and chili powder. Roast for 15 minutes.

Cut beets into small cubes. Toss in olive oil place on baking sheet and roast for 30-40 minutes or until tender.

Cook farro by directions and cool. Whisk together ingredients for dressing: apple cider vinegar, maple syrup, olive oil, paprika, chili powder, salt and pepper.

In a large bowl add kale, squash, farro, beets and chopped raw onion. Add dressing and mix well. Top with goat cheese and a garnish of parsley.

Summer CSA, Week 14

Much of this week was spent conversing around the carrot box. Filling an infinite amount of bags. Some for you, our trusted CSA members. Some for the co-ops and some for Harvest Fest.

I met many a wonderful faces at Harvest Fest this year. I was lucky enough to stand next to John Fisher-Merritt most of the afternoon. To my perception everyone knew John and those who didn’t found themselves buying peppers from him. After he sliced them a sample with his pocket knife of course.

This week I listened. Chose to speak less and absorb more. I gathered from my listening around the carrot box and reading this or that before bed that we are Earth.

Everyone that I talk to and experience daily knows this. Everyone that went to Harvest Fest knows this. Perhaps even those who disagree with us understand this as well.

We are Earth. Everything we created came from Earth. Everything we use today is derived from Earth.

This very broad statement can send you into a head spin. It can make you think of all the ways humans are ruining Earth and causing her pain. Or you can think of all the ways humans can be kind to the Earth and show our appreciation everyday.

Talking nice to the carrots as we put them in their bags. Telling the beans they are growing great and we are happy to be harvesting them in the rain. Listening to the coyotes and wolves roam in the distance. Choosing in any certain moment not to add your own two cents but rather to absorb what others have to say.

We are Earth. Our journey with Earth to grow and evolve has not always been beautiful. But I’m grateful.

I’m grateful someone invented a carrot harvester and that we used it this week. I’m grateful the mini-Food Farmers went back to school and are enjoying learning! I’m grateful the new laying hens are starting to lay little eggs.

But most of all I’m grateful I get to spend each day working with people who make me smile and laugh.

From an Earthly farm crew,

Tiffany

P.S. The Thyme would enjoy it if you hung it in a place in your kitchen with airflow. Maybe a window or such. It would enjoy making your kitchen smell lovely and not being in your refrigerator.


In your CSA Box:

Yellow Beans, Carrots, Cucumbers, Leeks, Onions, Green Pepper, Hot Wax Pepper, Potatoes, Thyme, Tomatoes, Zucchini


Zucchini Muffins

  • 2 Small zucchini
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • Chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Chop zucchini into small pieces and purée in food processor. Combine zucchini purée with sugar, eggs, vegetable oil. Combine flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Combine wet and dry mixtures together. Add chocolate chips for pazazzz.

Line a muffin pan with cute liners or grease. Place batter in pan and cook 35-40 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean.

Roasted Carrot Soup

  • 1-1/2 pounds of carrots
  • 1 large yellow onion
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1-1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 2 cups peeled tomatoes
  • 1 tbsp minced basil

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt, pepper and cumin two cooking sheets. Enduring the veggies do not crowd each other roast carrots, onion and garlic for 25-30 minutes.

Working in two batches add half the veggies to a food processor. Add half the tomatoes and purée until smooth. Repeat with remaining ingredients.

Add both batches into a large pot. Add basil and remaining salt. Bring to a simmer and let sit for 10 minutes. Enjoy!

Summer CSA, Week 9

Fort Minor sang it best:

This is 10% luck

20% skill

15% concentrated power of will

5% pleasure

50% pain

100% reason to remember the name

Leptinotarsa decemlineata…..aka the potato bug

I haven’t decided if we should be “remembering the name” of the potato bug or the name of the fantastic farmers who have fought bravely in the fight to protect the potatoes. Nevertheless, perhaps all names should be considered.

This summer our farm crew has been fighting the good fight. So that we all may enjoy potatoes, not just in a week or two but through the long cold winter months.

Some interesting facts brought to you by the University of Minnesota Extension Office:

  • Potato bugs feed off of leaves; if left alone they will likely completely defoliate a potato plant
  • They spend the winter 5-10 inches underground, plotting their mischievous plans for the spring
  • They prefer temperatures in the mid 80s, allowing the larva to complete metamorphosis in 10 short days

Potato bug removal is 10% luck-because sometimes they can be sneaky and hide in the leaves. It is also 20% skill because we are trained experts in our profession. It is 15% concentrated power of will because the good fight has been a never ending story. It is 5% pleasure because there is satisfaction in a 5 gallon bucket of bugs. There is also 50% pain because it’s difficult to be hunched over for many hours.

I believe I speak for everyone who works and volunteers on the Food Farm when I say we are happy to do whatever it takes to protect these veggies. You deserve the best produce in a CSA box.

Speaking of protecting veggies, the fencing is going up across the road! Janaki, Garrett and I started to unroll fencing on Friday. The season of bounty is upon up; plenty of vegetables, plenty to do, and plenty of irrigating.

From a beautiful busy farm crew-

Tiffany


In your CSA box:

Basil – Green Cabbage – Carrots – Cilantro – Cucumbers – Kale – Lettuce – Green Onion – Snap Peas – Green pepper – Hot pepper – Tomatoes – Zucchini


Garlic Parmesan Roasted Snap Peas

  • 3 cups sugar snap peas
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 cup panko bread crumbs
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tbsp finely minced garlic
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped parsley
  • Salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Toss peas in olive oil to evenly coat. In separate bowl combine bread crumbs with Parmesan cheese, parsley and garlic. Add the panko bread crumb mixture to the peas and toss until evenly covered.

Arrange peas on greased baking sheet in a single layer. Bake for 15-20 minutes.

Lemon Zucchini Bread

  • 1-1/2 cup flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • Zest of one large lemon
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1-1/2 tsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1-1/2 cup grated zucchini

For the glaze!

  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 4 tsp lemon juice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease bread pan and set aside.

In large bowl whisk together dry ingredients; flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In another bow combine sugar and lemon zest. Add olive oil, lemon juice and eggs until smooth.

Combine dry ingredients to wet mixture. Fold in Zucchini last. Add mixture to bread pan. Bake 40-45 minutes.

Summer CSA, Week 7

This week I’ve been thinking about life in miniature.

What would life be like as a carrot? What does a potato bug think about?

When a human is thundering towards you, hunched over and wielding a bent steak knife as a carrot, I would be terrified. Standing at a height of no more than 4 inches tall carrots line up in rows. They stand together through wind whipping across a field, giant rain drops, humans with knives, and absent minded deer.

I imagine those little carrots are scared out of their minds by all the gigantic things that could hurt them in this world. But I also imagine those little carrots working through that fear, talking to each other with their little voices and radiating confidence. The more confident the carrot the tastier it is, obviously.

However I do not think that same theory applies to a potato bug. Do not eat potato bugs, gross. We spent a lot of time with potato bugs this week. Leaving much opportunity to mull over the possibility of them being some sort of indestructible super bug.

So what does a potato bug think about? Their whole world is around a couple of potato plants. Until they are adults they can only inch along like slugs. So do they chit chat with their friends while munching and destroying precious potato leaves? Do the adult bugs whisper sweet nothings into each others ears?

I don’t imagine a potato bug being afraid of much. They seem like simple minded creatures. Worry is low on their list of priorities. The potato bug is more into socializing, gluttony, and hibernation.

Seeing the world through a miniature perspective is a helpful reminder of how lucky we are to not be so mini. The wind across a field won’t blow us down. I cannot be shaken off a plant and put in a 5 gallon bucket.

That is pretty cool.

From a larger than life farm crew,

Tiffany


In your CSA box: Basil – Beets – Broccoli – Carrots – Cauliflower – Cucumbers – Garlic Scapes – Lettuce Mix – Green Onions – Zucchini – and a few surprise tomatoes!


To throw everyone for a loop I went with sweet treat recipes.

Zucchini Brownies

  • 1/2 cup Canola Oil or Olive Oil
  • 1-1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1/2 cup cocoa powder
  • 1-1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 cups shredded Zucchini

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine oil, sugar, vanilla in medium bowl.

Combine flour, cocoa powder, baking soda and salt in another bowl.

Combine flour mixture to sugar mixture. The batter is crumbly.

Stir Zucchini into batter. Batter should now be moist and thick.

Place batter into 8 x 11 inch baking dish.

Bake 25-30 minutes. Or until brownies are firm on edges of dish.

Flourless Orange Cauliflower Cake

  • 1-1/2 cup cooked puréed cauliflower
  • 6 large eggs
  • 1 cup sugar
  • Zest from one orange
  • 2-1/2 cups ground almond meal
  • 1 tbs corn starch
  • 1 tsp almond extract
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 heaping tsp baking powder

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease or line a spring foam baking pan. This is a sticky cake you need a spring foam pan.

Purée cauliflower and combine eggs. Mix until fully combine. Add sugar, zest, almond meal, corn starch, extracts, salt and baking powder.

Bake in prepared pan for 50-60 minutes or until set. Let cool in pan for 20 minutes before removing from pan.

Sprinkle cake with powdered sugar and orange zest once completely cooled and serve!

Summer CSA Week 5

Here comes summer

Here comes summer

Chirping robin, budding rose

Here comes summer

Here comes summer

Gentle showers, summer clothes

Here comes summer

Here comes summer

Whoosh–shiver–there it goes.

–Shel Silverstein

I was laid up for a few days this past week recovering from a tick born illness. When I came back to work on Wednesday I felt like I’d been gone a week!

The tomatoes in the green house are taller than I am. The cucumbers have become wildly prolific. All the row cover is off the cabbage and the broccoli are beautiful.

This season is what I live for. The warm air when the breeze blows. The sweltering heat when the sun is high in the sky. Sun burnt shoulders and tan faces. Bare feet in warm fields.

Summer can fly by in the blink of an eye if you aren’t careful to pay attention. We all get caught up in the work, because we are farmers and can’t help ourselves. There is a mile of cabbage to weed. There are tomatoes to trellis and boxes to wash. There is grass to mow and sunscreen to apply and water that needs to be drank.

I have to remind myself to pay attention, to stay conscious of what’s going on around me. Sam started harvesting a ton of cucumbers each day. I noticed that. But I had to pay attention to see it. The sun golds started turning yellow. I bet a I’ll get to eat a handful in a few days.

Dave planted basil in every nook and cranny of the green houses. But you have to look down for just a second to appreciate that.

We farmers do a special kind of dance. We all have different roles to play, different songs to sing. I like to imagine us from a birds eye view. Little objects floating around the farm, accomplishing so, so much.

From a tender loving farm crew

Tiffany


In your CSA box:

Carrots – Beets – Cucumbers – Broccoli- Green Onions – Romaine Lettuce – Garlic Scapes!


Broccoli Fritters

  • 8 oz broccoli including stem cut into small pieces
  • 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese (if you’re into that)
  • 2 large eggs, beaten
  • 2 Tbs flour
  • 1 Tbs olive oil
  • 1 tsp cayenne

Steam broccoli until tender. Drain excess water and pat dry. Toss broccoli in flour and cayenne. Combine egg to broccoli, then the cheese. Mix completely.

Place pan on medium heat. Add oil. Divide mixture into fourth and spoon into pan in patty form.

Cook on one side for 2-3 minutes or until bottom is golden brown. Flip and cook another 2-3 minutes

Asian Cucumber Salad

  • 4 cups VERY thinly sliced cucumber
  • 1/4 cup finely sliced red onion
  • 1/4 cup finely sliced red pepper
  • 1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
  • 1 tsp honey
  • 1 tsp sesame seeds
  • 1/2 tsp sesame oil
  • 1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 tsp salt

Add cucumber, onion, red pepper and sesame seeds to medium bowl. Set aside

In small bowl mix rice wine vinegar, honey, sesame oil, red pepper flakes and salt.

Add dressing to veggie mix, serve immediately raw let sit in fridge for a while to let the flavors meld

Summer CSA, Week 2

Summer Solstice is days away and the sunlight feels infinite.

This time of year everything looks so vividly green. The woods are thick with lush leaves and grass seems to grows back over night after its been mowed. The farm is fast paced here on out till after fall harvest. So it’s easy to get caught up in the work and forget to take a moment and breathe it all in.

I’ve seen three different mama ducks on the pond in the back with little babies. I always update the farm crew after I’ve seen them. I saw a great horned owl this past weekend fly in front of me and perch in a tree around dusk.

We’ve had a handful of sweltering day in June so far. But for the most part it’s been a mild end to spring. I keep saying I’m waiting for those hot days, those sleep with the windows open and run around in a tank top and shorts kind of days. But of course when those hot days do come a knocking I’ll be ill prepared without a hat or sunscreen. Inevitably getting oddly placed tan lines all across my body. So this is my public service announcement to be prepared, summer is coming.

Karin will be taking a baby sabbatical this summer starting hopefully on the solstice (then I win the pool) while the rest of us on the farm crew attempt to fill her shoes. I’m confident we will make her proud.

This week the farm crew began the season of weeding, the first planting of carrots got weeded along with many other rows, beds and aisle ways. The fields across the road have irrigation now and a mountain of seed potatoes was conquered.

Food is starting to leave the ground and enter your homes! I’m constantly amazed at just how much food we harvest in a season and how many people get to eat these wonderful veggies.

So thank you for being the consumer and thank you for putting up with me writing the newsletter in Karin’s absence. I’ll try to be as witty and well spoken as she is.

With fists fulls of greens,

Tiffany


In your share this week:

Green Onions – Greens mix – Rhubarb – Lettuce – Radishes – Spinach – Turnips


Spinach and Quinoa Patties

1 cup – uncooked quinoa OR 2 ½ cups pre-cooked quinoa, (black, white or red)
¾ cup – rolled oats
4 eggs
7 oz – feta cheese
4 cups – fresh spinach, chopped
sea salt & pepper
coconut oil, butter, olive oil or ghee for frying

Cook quinoa: Place 2 cups water, rinsed uncooked quinoa and a pinch of salt in a medium-size saucepan. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a bare simmer and gently cook for about 15 minutes, or until you see small tails on the quinoa seeds. Set aside to cool.

In a large mixing bowl, place cooked quinoa, oats, eggs, feta cheese, chopped spinach, salt and pepper and combine until all is mixed. Place in the fridge to set for 30 minutes.
Take out the mixture and form 10 to 12 patties with your hands. Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium heat. Add the patties and fry for about 2-3 minutes on each side or until golden brown. Serve with lettuce, tomatoes, soft boiled eggs, beans and sprouts or micro greens. The patties keep for 3-5 days in the fridge and freezes well.

Garlic Roasted Turnips (also works with radishes)

Turnips from CSA box! 2 Tablespoons olive oil or butter (melted) 1 teaspoon garlic power 1 teaspoon Oregano Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Remove greens and ends of turnips. Quarter turnips. In a mixing bowl mix ingredients together. Place turnips on baking sleet cut sides down. Roast 30-35 minutes or until fork tender and golden brown.

Summer CSA, Week 1

Here it is – the first Summer CSA Share! How nice that it actually looks and feels summery to be starting things off for the harvest season. This morning, I found myself eyeing up pants that I might cut into shorts – I am always aspiring for that 7-year-old scraped knee look.

Anyway, here we stand at the beginning of what I think will be a fantastic season. We img_20190602_145959574_hdrhave a rock star crew with Garrett, Sam and Tiff (from a few seasons back) returning, and a new face, Jane, who is not new to farming and is game for whatever we seem to throw at her. Of course Teri and Patricia and Dave are all back and in full swing planting for the CSA and keeping us organized in the pack shed. Now we’ll see less of Teri, since she’ll be running (sometimes literally) around delivering the shares on Mondays and Thursdays. Of course, with the harvest season we’ll see familiar faces of volunteers returning to help us a few different days a week. I’m excited to start this routine back up -it’s like going to summer camp, only with more lifting.

We had a full crew starting earlier than normal this season. Start times were a bit 20190605_095057staggered, but not by much. Even though things have been off to a cool and wet start, the crew has been getting some good projects rolling. The barn roof has been replaced, and the inside cleared through in preparation to remove the side wall so we (i.e., Janaki) can park more tractors and implements in there. All of the carrots are being planted across the road this year. If they get water on them, they’ll like that sandier soil. Or that’s the idea. The deer of Wrenshall also seem to like it over there, and the crew has been in a race against the clock to get a deer fence up. Wooden posts are in at the corners, H braces made, T posts in progress… if nothing else the activity around there must be a turn off for a curious herd.

I am in my own race against the clock every day. Any time now, my project of 8 1/2 months will be joining me in the outside world. I’ll be missing almost an entire farm season, but starting my own season of sorts -and we’re delighted.

I am leaving the newsletter, and probably other projects I haven’t thought of yet, in the capable hands of Tiff. She’s a kick -you’ll all like her I’m sure.

As some of you know (hopefully) from seasons and newsletters past, we’re glad you’ve chosen to plan your meals and your time around getting our CSA share. Your investment in our farm makes the season, the hiring of the amazing crew, and all the projects for sustainability possible.

If you’re new to all of this, welcome! Thanks for seeking out a new way to get food onto your table. Sometimes aspects of getting a share can be daunting. If you’re new (or even not so new) and find yourself with questions about how to use things, or tricks about storage or how to put some things away, reach out and we can connect you with other members who are pros at using up a share. Personally, I just cook most things in butter and put an egg on top – but that’s not for everyone.

Thank you for slowing down some of your meals, and being outside norm of the constant “grab and go” way we treat food in this culture.

For the hall of famers and farmers crew,

Karin

 


In your share this week:

Greens Mix – Green Onions – Romaine and Bibb Lettuce – Pac Choi – Rhubarb – Spinach


Pac Choi with Ginger and Garlic

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
  • 8 cups chopped fresh pac choi
  • 2 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • Ground black pepper to taste

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and ginger and cook 1 minute. Add bok choy and soy sauce cook 3 to 5 minutes, until greens are wilted and stalks are crisp-tender. Season, to taste, with black pepper.


 

Rustic Rhubarb Tarts, from The Smitten Kitchen

  • 1 cup corn flour
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup fine cornmeal
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Kosher or coarse salt
  • 1 stick (4 ounces) cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons heavy cream
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1 batch Rhubarb Vanilla Compote (recipe below)

In a food processor: Combine the dry ingredients in the work bowl of your food processor. Add the butter and pulse in short bursts, until the mixture resembles coarse cornmeal. Add heavy cream and egg yolks and pulse until combined; it will look crumbly but it will become one mass when kneaded together.

In a stand mixer: Whisk the dry ingredients in the bowl of a stand mixer. Using the paddle attachment, add the butter and turn the mixture speed to low (you’ll want to lock the top, so the mixture doesn’t fly about) and mix to break up the butter. Increase the speed to medium and mix until the butter is as coarse as cornmeal. Add the heavy cream and egg yolks and mix until combined. The dough will look crumbly but when pinched between your fingers, it will come together.

By hand: The butter can also be blended into the dry ingredients with a pastry blender, or you fingertips. The cream and egg yolks can be mixed into the butter mixture with a wooden spoon. You’ll likely want to turn the dough out onto a counter to gently knead it into one mass.

Shape the tarts: Divide the dough into 10 equal pieces. Lightly flour a work surface and using the heel of your hand, flatten the dough into a rough circle. Continue flattening until it is approximately 5 inches in diameter. Try to work quickly, so the dough doesn’t get too warm and soft, making it harder to handle. For more elegant edges, gently flatten the outer edge of the circle with your fingertips, making it thinner than the rest of the dough.

Spoon 3 tablespoons of the Rhubarb Vanilla Compote into the center of the dough. Fold the edge of the dough toward the compote and up, to create a ruffled edge; continue around the perimeter, letting the ruffles be their bad irregular selves. Slide a bench scraper or spatula under the tart and transfer it to a parchment-lined baking sheet. Continue with the remaining dough. Freeze the tarts on their tray for at least 1 hour or up to 2 weeks, wrapped tightly in plastic.

Bake the tarts: Preheat over to 375°F. Bake tarts, still frozen, for about 35 minutes or until the edges of the tarts are brown and the rhubarb is bubbling and thick. Serve warm or at room temperature. The tarts keep in an airtight container (or not, as I forgot to wrap mine and they were still awesome the next day) for up to 2 days.

Rhubarb Vanilla Compote

1 1/2 pounds rhubarb stalks
1 cup minus 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar (i.e. 15 tablespoons, if you want to drive yourself mad)
1/2 vanilla bean, split and seeds scraped

Rinse the rhubarb stalks and trim the very ends. Cut them in half lengthwise (unless they’re very slim) and then on the diagonal into 3/4-inch chunks. Leaving the last 1 1/2 cups aside, put 3 cups of the rhubarb into a large, heavy-bottomed pot. Add the brown sugar, vanilla bean seeds and pods and turn the heat to medium low. (You want to start at a low temperature to encourage the rhubarb to release its liquid. Unlike most compotes, this one adds no water.) Cook the rhubarb mixture, covered, for about 15 minutes, or until the mixture is saucy. Remove the cover and increase the heat to medium, cooking an additional 15 to 17 minutes, or until the rhubarb is completely broken down and thick enough that a spoon leaves a trail at the bottom of the pan. Discard your vanilla bean pods and add remaining rhubarb chunks to the compote. Pour the compote out onto a large plate to cool.