Summer CSA Week 8, 2022

– Sights around the farm: tractors, sprawling fields, and farm house hydrangeas.

New in the box this week we have tomatoes and basil; the perfect pair. Now we really know it’s summer! Janaki has taken a well earned vacation with his family this week. The farm crew is happy to hold down the fort here in Wrenshall. We’re still planting fall brassicas, weeding young plants, and looking forward to the coming preserving shares.


In your share this week:

Basil – Broccoli – Carrots with Tops – Cucumber – Kale – Lettuce – Green Onion – Snap Peas – Tomato – Zucchini


Guess what vegetable these baby plants will grow up into!

Scroll to the bottom for the answer.


Quinoa Vegetable Salad with Tahini Dressing

Ingredients

  • 4 cups chopped kale
  • 1 ½ cup chopped cucumber
  • 1 ½ cup snap peas trimmed
  • 1 cup chopped tomatoes
  • 1/3 cup quinoa (or 1 cup cooked quinoa. Raw quinoa will give you 3x as much cooked quinoa)

Tahini Dressing

  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons tahini (sesame paste)
  • 1 tablespoon warm water
  • 1 teaspoon agave nectar (can substitute with honey)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Cook Quinoa – If you are starting with cooked quinoa, skip to step 3! Rinse raw quinoa for 30 seconds in a fine mesh colander. Drain well.
  2. Combine the rinsed quinoa and 2/3 cups water in a saucepan. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium-high heat, then decrease the heat a bit to maintain a gentle simmer. Cook until the quinoa has absorbed all of the water, about 10 minutes.
  3. Remove the pot from heat, cover, and let the quinoa steam for 5 minutes. Remove the lid and fluff the quinoa with a fork. Season with a pinch of salt. Allow to cool completely.
  4. Make the Dressing – In a small glass bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, tahini, water and agave nectar. If the tahini is difficult to whisk, microwave the mixture on HIGH for about 10 seconds. Salt and pepper to taste.
  5. Assemble the Salad – Place the kale in a colander and run warm water over it while massaging the leaves until the kale softens.
  6. In a large bowl, combine the kale, cucumber, snap peas, tomatoes and quinoa. Toss with the dressing. Serve.

Based of a recipes from Cookin’ Canuck and Cookie + Kate


Views of a greenhouse:

Outside
Inside

Celery!

This is a young celery plant. Celery is related to parsnips, carrot and parsley. Celery is grown for the stalks and leaves, and ground celery seed is used as a spice.  

For the farm crew,

Starr

Summer CSA, Week 9

Fort Minor sang it best:

This is 10% luck

20% skill

15% concentrated power of will

5% pleasure

50% pain

100% reason to remember the name

Leptinotarsa decemlineata…..aka the potato bug

I haven’t decided if we should be “remembering the name” of the potato bug or the name of the fantastic farmers who have fought bravely in the fight to protect the potatoes. Nevertheless, perhaps all names should be considered.

This summer our farm crew has been fighting the good fight. So that we all may enjoy potatoes, not just in a week or two but through the long cold winter months.

Some interesting facts brought to you by the University of Minnesota Extension Office:

  • Potato bugs feed off of leaves; if left alone they will likely completely defoliate a potato plant
  • They spend the winter 5-10 inches underground, plotting their mischievous plans for the spring
  • They prefer temperatures in the mid 80s, allowing the larva to complete metamorphosis in 10 short days

Potato bug removal is 10% luck-because sometimes they can be sneaky and hide in the leaves. It is also 20% skill because we are trained experts in our profession. It is 15% concentrated power of will because the good fight has been a never ending story. It is 5% pleasure because there is satisfaction in a 5 gallon bucket of bugs. There is also 50% pain because it’s difficult to be hunched over for many hours.

I believe I speak for everyone who works and volunteers on the Food Farm when I say we are happy to do whatever it takes to protect these veggies. You deserve the best produce in a CSA box.

Speaking of protecting veggies, the fencing is going up across the road! Janaki, Garrett and I started to unroll fencing on Friday. The season of bounty is upon up; plenty of vegetables, plenty to do, and plenty of irrigating.

From a beautiful busy farm crew-

Tiffany


In your CSA box:

Basil – Green Cabbage – Carrots – Cilantro – Cucumbers – Kale – Lettuce – Green Onion – Snap Peas – Green pepper – Hot pepper – Tomatoes – Zucchini


Garlic Parmesan Roasted Snap Peas

  • 3 cups sugar snap peas
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 cup panko bread crumbs
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tbsp finely minced garlic
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped parsley
  • Salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Toss peas in olive oil to evenly coat. In separate bowl combine bread crumbs with Parmesan cheese, parsley and garlic. Add the panko bread crumb mixture to the peas and toss until evenly covered.

Arrange peas on greased baking sheet in a single layer. Bake for 15-20 minutes.

Lemon Zucchini Bread

  • 1-1/2 cup flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • Zest of one large lemon
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1-1/2 tsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1-1/2 cup grated zucchini

For the glaze!

  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 4 tsp lemon juice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease bread pan and set aside.

In large bowl whisk together dry ingredients; flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In another bow combine sugar and lemon zest. Add olive oil, lemon juice and eggs until smooth.

Combine dry ingredients to wet mixture. Fold in Zucchini last. Add mixture to bread pan. Bake 40-45 minutes.