Summer CSA Week 4, 2022

We have fun, even when mulching tomatoes on a hot day.

Happy Fourth of July! I hope you enjoy some family time, great food, and protect your dogs from the scary firework noises.

On the farm we’re celebrating with our first harvest of carrots! The carrots in the share this week are coming with their tops ON because carrots greens are edible and TASTY. See below for a carrot top pesto recipe.


In your share this week:

Green Onions – Broccoli – Lettuce – Carrots with tops – Radishes


Carrot Top Pesto

Ingredients

1/3 cup pine nuts (try substituting cashews, walnuts or sunflower seeds)

2 small cloves garlic, peeled

4 cups lightly packed, well washed and dried carrot top greens (from 1 1-pound bunch of carrots)

1 cup lightly packed fresh basil leaves, plus more as needed (NOTE: If your bunch of carrots yields less than 4 cups of greens, add as much basil as you need to get a total of 5 cups of greens.)

1/3 cup (1 ounce) freshly grated Parmesan cheese

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

1 tablespoon water

1/2 teaspoon fine salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Preparation

  1. In a small, dry skillet over medium heat, toast the pine nuts, shaking the pan frequently, until fragrant and golden brown, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a plate and let cool slightly.
  2. In a food processor, process the pine nuts with garlic until minced. Add the carrot tops, basil, cheese, lemon juice, water, salt and pepper and process until finely minced. With the machine running, slowly pour the oil in a steady stream through the feed tube and process until well blended.

Radish Salad

1 serving

Ingredients

6 radishes

1/2 tablespoon salt, plus more to season

vinaigrette or orange juice

olive oil

pepper

red pepper flakes (optional)

mint or parsley (garnish)

Preparation

  1. Cut about radishes into matchsticks or sliced very thinly and placed in a bowl of cold water with a tablespoon of salt. Let the radishes soak for about 15 minutes, drain them, and rinse them well.
  2. Dress the radishes with a vinaigrette or orange juice and a bit of olive oil. Salt and pepper to taste. Add a pinch of hot pepper flakes if you like them and garnish with mint or parsley.


Last week we mulched the field tomatoes (pictured above). These tomatoes are paste type tomatoes for sauces and will go towards the canning tomato preserving share. Food Farm preserving shares are one-time boxes made specially for the canning crowd. Whether you want to stock up on freezer pesto, make all your family dilly beans for Christmas, or perfect your marinara recipe, the preserving shares are ideal for community members who want bulk orders of the freshest local produce. Canning tomatoes will be ready for pick-up between the beginning of August and the first frost, but you can (and should!) get your preserving share order in now at foodfarm.csaware.com .

We are fortunate at the Food Farm to have enough space and appropriate equipment to grow our own mulch. Other farms have to buy in straw. Janaki cuts fields of tall rye cover crop and then the crew tucks in the tomatoes using sleds and pitchforks. It’s like sledding, but all uphill and a lot more itchy! The mulch will suppress the weeds and keep in soil moisture so our tomatoes grow big and strong.

Golden hour on the farm.

For the farm crew,

Starr

Summer CSA Week 3, 2022

Ellis with turnips

Welcome to summer! June 21st was the Summer Solstice, the longest day and shortest night of the year. We received 15 hours 52 minutes on the farm!


In your share this week:

Green Top Beets – Lettuce – Green Onions – Pac Choi – Radishes – Spinach – Salad Turnips


A note on this week’s spinach: our previous batches of spinach have come from our greenhouses which means they have been protected from the elements. This week’s spinach is from the field, so you may find it a little dusty from splash back from the rain and wind. We don’t wash the spinach on farm, because we find it lasts longer if we don’t get it wet before we get it to you. When you’re ready to use your spinach give it a wash, and either wash and dry the bag or transfer it to a clean bag. See how to wash greens in the video we posted last week!


Beets with greens ready to go out in a CSA share!

The beet beat: did you now every part of the beet is edible? Beets tend to mature at varying rates, so you’ll probably find a range of sizes in your bunch this week. One thing they all have in common is delicious greens! Beet greens can be prepared any way you’d prepare kale. The most common way to prepare beet greens is in a sauté. Coat a pan with olive oil and cook your greens until they are wilted and tender (5 to 8 minutes). Add minced garlic, salt and pepper, or try experiencing with any of your favorite seasonings and aromatics.


You will find lots of salad turnips in your share this week! These turnips are best eaten fresh, but can be cooked (see a recipe below). These turnips are similar to radishes, but without the spiciness. You’ll find the turnips delightfully crunchy and juicy. Throw them in a big salad or eat them straight as a snack.

Here is a turnip poem written by a nine-year-old Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. It sounds like Longfellow only had access to old storage turnips. This poem might be a little more joyful if it was a fresh salad turnip they were eating, but we still love any literary ode to veggies.

Mr. Finney’s Turnip

By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Mr. Finney had a turnip,
And it grew, and it grew,
And it grew behind the barn,
And the turnip did no harm.

And it grew, and it grew,
Till it could grow no taller;
Then Mr. Finney took it up
And put it in the cellar.

There it lay, there it lay,
Till it began to rot ;
When his daughter Susie washed it
And put it in the pot.

Then she boiled it and boiled it,
As long as she was able;
Then his daughter Susie took it
And put it on the table.

Mr. Finney and his wife
Both sat down to sup;
And they ate, and they ate,
Until they ate the turnip up.

Lebanese Pink Pickled Turnips

Ingredients

1 pound turnips, peeled, quartered, and sliced 1/4 inch thick

1 small beet, peeled and quartered

1 clove garlic thinly sliced

1/2 cup vinegar

2 tablespoons kosher salt

1 teaspoon sugar

1 1/2 cups water

Preparation

  1. Put turnips, beet and garlic into a wide mouth heatproof 1 quart jar.
  2. In a small saucepan, bring vinegar, salt, sugar and water to a boil. When salt and sugar are completely dissolved, pour brine over vegetables to fill the jar. Leave to cool.
  3. When completely cool, cover jar and chill for 1 week.

Caramelized Hakurei Turnips

“Hakurei” turnips are another name for salad turnips, originally developed in Japan.

Ingredients

4 servings

2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for greasing the baking sheet

2 bunches hakurei turnips, greens removed, washed but not peeled

1 teaspoon kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Grease baking sheet lightly with olive oil.
  2. Slice the turnips about 1/4 inch thick. You can do this with the slicing disk of a food processor, an adjustable mandoline, or by hand with a knife.
  3. Combine turnips with 2 tablespoons of olive oil and salt in a large bowl. Toss and coat turnips.
  4. Pile turnips on prepared baking sheet, spreading them as close as possible to a single layer.
  5. Roast the turnips until they are crisp and golden around the edges, 15-20 minutes. Shuffle turnips and roast 5 minutes more. Remove from oven and top with freshly ground black pepper.

Basic Vinaigrette

Spring and early summer is the season of greens! It is easy to make your own salad dressing at home. I like to put all my vinaigrette ingredients in a jar, and shake to combine. That way any dressing I don’t use, I can leave in the fridge for a future salad! Add any seasonings and herbs you prefer for different flavors.

Ingredients

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon whole grain dijon mustard
1 ½ teaspoon maple syrup (or agave)
1 teaspoon fine grain kosher salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper

Preparation

  1. Combine!

Greenhouse after harvesting beets and scallions for Monday’s shares. Lots more tasty produce to come!

For the farm crew,

Starr

Summer CSA Week 2, 2022

Super star Food Farm member, Lynne, shows us how to unbox your veggie box and keep the produce fresh for your consumption!

Week 2 of the CSA! Our crew is back in the CSA rhythm and excited to bring you more delicious produce. Thanks to some super star volunteers we have an educational video for you about how to take care of the producing coming in your shares. Experienced CSA members and newbies alike will benefit from watching the video above!

Things are moving fast here at the farm, the hustle intensifies in hot weather as both crops and weeds develop quickly and need attention. On a related note: that’s why there are three heads of lettuce in your share this week!


In your share this week:

Broccoli – Head Lettuce – Oregano – Pac Choi – Potatoes – Radishes – Spinach


This share includes the last of the 2021 potatoes. This is very late to store potatoes, so please keep them in the refrigerator and use them quickly. If your potatoes sprout you can still break off the sprouts and use the potato as usual. You’ll have potatoes in your box again in August when our first crop of “new” potatoes is ready.


Greek Potatoes

Ingredients

6 servings

6 medium potatoes, cubed (3 pounds)

1/2 cup fresh lemon juice (~2 1/2 lemons)

1/3 cup vegetable oil

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

11/2 tablespoon fresh oregano

2 garlic gloves, minced

3 cups hot water

chopped fresh parsley

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 475 degrees.
  2. Toss together potatoes, lemon juice, salt, pepper, oregano and garlic in a deep flat pan about 8 x 12 inches. Add water to the pan.
  3. Bake for 1 1/2 hours at 475. Stir every 20 minutes adding more if needed to prevent sticking. Be careful not to burn in the last 30 minutes of cooking. During the final 15 to 20 minutes, allow water to evaporate.
  4. Garnish with fresh parsley and serve.

You can also try recipes from past newsletters like:

Pac Choi and Shiitake Stir-fry

Quick, spicy pickled radishes


The Free Range Film Festival is THIS WEEK. This is your opportunity to come out to Wrenshall and watch independent films in a beautiful historic barn. Friday and Saturday at 7pm. There will also be music by Darin Bergsven and the Denfeld Honors Quartet and a food truck on site. We’d love to see you there!

909 County Road 4, Wrenshall MN

June 24 & 25, 7:00pm

While there is officially no charge for admission, the organizers do ask audience members for a $10 donation to help pay for barn maintenance.

For the farm crew,

Starr

Summer CSA Week 1, 2022

Planting broccoli

Welcome to the 2022 summer CSA season! Thank you for being part of our community. You enable us to do what we love! After a cool slow start up, it’s starting to look like summer. The dry weather of the last two weeks have been great for getting field work done and the farm is finally looking lush and green. The farm crew has been hard at work weeding and planting, and we’re excited to begin harvesting as well!


In your share this week:

Dill – Greens Mix – Head Lettuce – Potatoes – Rhubarb – Spinach


Potatoes in June? Yes! This is a first for us–we had such a good crop last fall that we were able to save some for the first two shares. This is very late in their storage life, however, so please keep them in the refrigerator or they will sprout quite quickly. Sprouts aren’t bad though, so just break them off and use the potato as usual.

A note on the greens mix: our greens mix includes a special blend of kale, mustard and other members of the brassica plant family. This year we have seen an increase in flea beetle activity, which leaves little holes in the leaves of these plants. This is totally harmless; in fact, in French markets people seek out greens with these holes because it demonstrates the produce was grown organically without harmful pesticides! This can however increase the product’s spiciness. The greens mix makes excellent fresh eating in salads, but if you find this batch too spicy for you, a quick cook will mellow out the flavor. Try adding the greens mix to soup or lightly sautéing the greens with olive oil, a dash of salt and any other preferred spices.

Lilacs overlooking the fields

I love the German variation on potato salad. With its olive oil and vinegar base, it is much lighter and brighter than the Midwestern mayonnaise based recipes. This brightness allows the herbs to really shine in this dish. When parsley comes into season, you can also try substituting the dill for bacon and parsley. Enjoy!

German Potato Salad with Dill (From Bon Appétit)

Ingredients

6 Servings

2 pounds small potatoes, halved and scrubbed

¼ cup olive oil

½ onion, chopped

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

¼ cup apple cider vinegar

4 scallions, sliced

2 tablespoons fresh dill, chopped

1teaspoon caraway seeds, toasted

Preparation

Step 1: Cover potatoes with cold salted water, bring to a boil, and cook until tender; drain and transfer to a large bowl.

Step 2: Meanwhile, heat oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion; season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring often, until soft, about 5 minutes.

Step 3: Remove from heat and mix in vinegar. Add to potatoes along with scallions, dill, and caraway seeds and toss, crushing potatoes slightly; season with salt and pepper.

You can also try recipes from past newsletters like:

Dilly Veggie Dip

Spinach and Quinoa Patties

Rhubarb Vanilla Compote


Finding Archived Recipes

You can now search previously posted Food Farm recipes using the “Tag Cloud” below. If you click an ingredient below it will take you to a list of the newsletters that include a recipe using that ingredient. Larger text means there are many recipes using that ingredient while smaller text means fewer recipes have been tagged so far.

Arugula Basil Beet Broccoli Brussels Sprouts Cabbage Carrot Carrot Leaf Carrrot Celery Chard Chives Cilantro Cucumber Delicata Squash Dill Dressing/Sauce Egg Garlic Garlic Scape Green Bean Green Onion Kale Leek Lettuce Mint Napa Cabbage Onion Pac Choi Parsley Parsnip Pepper Potato Radish Red Onion Rutabaga Scallion Shallot Spinach Thyme Tomato Turnip Winter Squash Yellow Onion Zucchini

We hope this will help you explore new and old recipes and take advantage of the produce in your share!

Chester, the Great Pyrenees and Food Farm guardian

For the farm crew,

Starr

Food Farm Veggie Guide

We hope you’re as excited about your CSA share as we are here at the Food Farm. Above is our newly updated “Vegetable Guide,” which outlines a majority of the crops our CSA members will be getting in their shares this season. This guide will help you know when to anticipate specific veggies, how to store each type of produce for optimal freshness and some ideas for cooking. Click the “Download” button to save the file as a pdf on your computer.